What Has Two Thumbs, One And A Half Chins, And Is Quickly Raising Funds For A Brewery?

by Gary Gulley on August 24, 2013 · 1 comment

in Financing, Investment, SBA, Small Business Loan

This guy right here! Hi again! It’s been awhile. I’ve been busy as usual, and I actually got to take a family vacation to Wisconsin this past week, which was much needed.

So let’s do some status updates. First and foremost, investor fundraising is going through the roof! As of yesterday Panic has 48.5% of the investor funding goal in the bank, as in, actually deposited in the Panic savings account! That’s after 2.5 weeks of official fundraising. Not bad, eh? And there is at least another 25% on its way, just coordinating meetings and phone calls to answer final questions and figure out document signing logistics.

It would be nice to sit back and spend some time trying to absorb the fact that my over 2.5 years of planning is actually paying off but we’re not there yet. Still lots to do, like……

As my investor funding comes in, it’s now time to pivot a bit from investor/lease mode to investor/lease/bank loan mode. As I’ve written in the past, there are two pieces to the funding puzzle. Investor funds will be used for things like construction build out, operational cash flow for the first year+ and miscellaneous other expenses that a bank won’t want to pay for. The bank loan, which is larger than the investor funds, will be used primarily for purchasing the brewing and packaging equipment, ingredients, packaging supplies and other tangible assets

Before a bank will loan me money, they want to see skin in the game, meaning they want to see how much money I’m putting into the business (meaning my own personal investment plus investor funds). For a start up, a bank likes to see anywhere from 25-50% of the total start up cost provided by the business before they’re comfortable with providing the rest. The actual percentage is based on the bank’s risk appetite, their financial health, the loanee’s credit rating (mine is stellar, just sayin’), the business plan, the size of the loan request, and much more.

Now that I’m about to blow by the 50% of the investor funding requirements, I can start the loan process. This is the tricky part. Will a bank see that I have half of the investor funds plus my personal investment, feel comfortable that the rest will be funded in the future before it’s needed, and loan me the rest? Or will I have to be at 75% or more before a bank will even consider the risk? Well, based on what I’ve been told by business bankers, 50% is a good place to start the loan application process, which I officially did yesterday!

My bankers are very powerful people, as clearly shown here. Once I have their money, I too will be very powerful. Might even buy a suit.

My bankers are very powerful people, as clearly shown here. Once I have their money, I too will be very powerful. Might even buy a suit.

I will be applying with one very large bank, and one local bank at first. The local bank was referred to me by one of my investors who has been a business customer with the bank for a decade. I was given an introduction, we chatted on the phone, and the business plan was emailed out. I should have some kind of feel next week as to whether or not a loan with either institution is a possibility. Both loans will most likely be backed by the SBA and that should be quite the learning experience.

Next up in my three prong attack is the lease. My real estate agent put in a Letter of Intent to the owner of the property I’m interested in leasing last week. The first thing the owner wants to see are my finances, which is expected. So here we have a bit of a catch-22. I can’t get a lease without my finances in place. What does the owner want to see? No idea yet. Just like banks, commercial real estate owners have different risk appetites based on their particular situation. Maybe the owner will see my investor funding total and be comfortable with that. Maybe they’ll want to see the bank loan in place. The latter is probably most likely. Now the bank wants to know if I have a location. Well, no, I don’t, because I need my finances in place. So far, it appears that as long as I’ve identified a location and am in the leasing process, the banks aren’t too concerned. Having a location in mind though will very, very likely help assuage the loan underwriters. I’ll report back on that once I know.

I’ll have some other news to report which I’ll do in the very next blog post to help break things up a bit.

Cheers!

G

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Christian October 11, 2013 at 12:29 pm

hey… great blog about the process & challenges of starting a brewery. I live in Portland OR, home to a very popular craft brew scene. I am also working on my MBA degree and my capstone project is going to be around writing a business plan for a brewpub. I am doing a lot of research right now, and I came across a good article about a new brewery in SanDiego, and how they raised 1.25 million. http://beerpulse.com/2012/09/how-i-raised-1-25-million-to-start-my-brewery/

Cheers, Christian

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